Home of Ammon Underwood

East Columbia, Texas

Asa Underwood, for whom Asa Underwood Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution is named, was born at Woburn, Massachusetts, on August 30, 1752. Asa, like many of the men who made up the army of the Revolution, was not a soldier by trade, but a peaceful, landowning farmer who laid aside the plow to fight for his countryís freedom. When a campaign ended, he would return to till the soil so dearly bought, only to march again to war when the need arose. He was 23 when he marched with Col. Davis Greenís regiment on the alarm of April 19, 1775, at Cambridge, and afterward saw service at intervals thereafter throughout the war. 

Asa Underwood was twice married and fathered 13 children. He died at Dracut, Massachusetts, on October 3, 1834, and is buried there. One of his sons, Ammon, emigrated to Texas in 1834 where he settled at East Columbia, then called Marion, and conducted a successful mercantile business. He took part in the fight for Texas Independence and in the affairs of the young republic. 

The Asa Underwood Chapter was organized on November 24, 1941, by his great-granddaughter, Laura Underwood. Eight of his descendants are past or present members of the chapter which bears his name. The Ammon Underwood home still stands in East Columbia and is open for tours by appointment.

West Columbia is known as the First Capitol of Texas and a replica of the first capitol building can be found there. An original cistern belonging to the time period was recently found, and the area has been made into the Capital of Texas Park. The new park, in the heart of West Columbia, was dedicated in the spring of 2009. Each September, our Asa Underwood Chapter helps host the Constitution Week DAR celebration "Bells Across America" there.
 


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Last update October 17, 2012